Stating the obvious

Riding on my tricycle, I refused to use the sidewalk because it was, “too easy”

Life threw me a bit of resistance from the start. I was born a right arm, below-the elbow-amputee. I quantify it as “a bit” because I can’t say my physical difference is anything more than just that, a difference. When I started my fitness journey, I heard the word “inspiration” a lot but it never sat well with me. I always thought, this isn’t that hard. I felt like making a big deal about it placed the reason for my accomplishments on my difference when in reality, I was just full of grit from the start.

The picture above is from when I was three years old. The story goes, I refused to ride my tricycle on the sidewalk because it was “too easy”. Instead, I opted for the grass.

In other words, I had to turn up the resistance. Life comes full circle, huh?

In my life, I’ve dodged any obvious bullying and never let people’s ignorance impact me too much. I’m not unaffected. It does trigger me sometimes, but the amazing people I have surrounded myself with overshadow those few individuals.

I was having coffee with a friend of mine recently when she asked if I ever thought about how my life would be different if I wasn’t born this way. In truth, during my adolescent years, I did think about it a lot. I got a little lost in the unfairness. But now, I’m able to stand firm in the idea that this is who I am, and I truly like it.

Would my life be different? Maybe. But I can say for certain, it wouldn’t be better.

I wanted to speak to the reason for my difference because I know people are curious and I never want to hide it. But the idea of Adapt Do Repeat is about something so much greater than how I adapt my fitness routines. It’s truly about the resilience of the human spirit and encouraging people to see what can happen when you challenge your perceived limits.

But, FYI: the limit does not exist.